Vladimir Ulyantsev's lecture "Bioinformatics: How genomic data helps to study the origin of people and the mechanisms of disease development"

+GoingAlready go 11 people

Description

On August 27, Vladimir Ulyantsev, associate professor at ITMO University's Information Technologies and Programming Faculty and head of the International Laboratory "Computer Technologies", will give a lecture "Bioinformatics: How genomic data helps to study the origin of people and the mechanisms of disease development" at the New Holland island and creative space. 

The invention and massmarket launch of devices for the extraction of genomic data from the DNA unlocked the opportunities that were unenvisageable not too long ago: a possibility to trace thousands of years back to the genesis of a whole populations of living organisms, for example humans, or to understand the mechanisms underlying the interaction between the organisms existing in our gut. Our present vision of life on Earth would be impossible were it not for the creation of the new bioinformatic algorithms for computer analysis of massive amounts of genetic data. In his lecture at New Holland, Vladimir Ulyantsev will examine how bioinformatics advances the research on the populations development and the mechanisms residing in humans and the environment. 

Vladimir Ulyantsev is a PhD in technical sciences, head of the the International Laboratory "Computer Technologies", and associate professor at ITMO University's Information Technologies and Programming Faculty.

Admission is free of charge, but the number of places is limited. To attend, please submit your registration here. The lecture will be held in Russian.

The lecture is held as part of ITMO University's Open Lecture Hall initiative, which is coordinated by Dmitry Malkov, head of ITMO's Science Communication Center. 

The main goal of the Open Lecture Hall initiative is to provide a comprehensive and exciting overview of the latest advancements in science and technology through the lens of the current social, political and economic climate. How can computer technologies forecast the spreading of epidemics, why do economists scan the human brain, and why most people don’t care about climate change — these and other questions will be discussed by leading researchers, experts and science communicators.

Participants

Everyone is very welcome to attend.

Organizers

New Holland
Archive by year: